New terahertz imaging approach could speed up skin cancer detection
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SCIENCE : PHYSICS
Researchers have developed a new terahertz imaging approach that, for the first time, can acquire micron-scale resolution images while retaining computational approaches designed to speed up image acquisition. This combination could allow terahertz imaging to be useful for detecting early-stage skin cancer without requiring a tissue biopsy from the patient.
Sharp X-ray pulses from the atomic nucleus
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SCIENCE : PHYSICS
X-rays make the invisible visible: they permit the way materials are structured to be determined all the way down to the level of individual atoms. In the 1950s it was x-rays which revealed the double-helix structure of DNA. With new x-ray sources, such as the XFEL free-electron laser in Hamburg, it is even possible to "film" chemical reactions. The results obtained from studies using these new x-ray sources may be about to become even more precise. A team around Kilian Heeg from the Max Planck
Breakthrough ink discovery could transform the production of new laser and optoelectronic devices
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SCIENCE : PHYSICS
A breakthrough 'recipe' for inkjet printing, which could enable high-volume manufacturing of next-generation laser and optoelectronic technologies, has been uncovered by Cambridge researchers.
Ask a Physicist: Balancing Gravity
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SCIENCE : PHYSICS
Greyson wrote in this week to ask: What would happen if you put a metal object in between the earth and a magnet that had the same pull as...
Super-photostable fluorescent labeling agent for super-resolution microscopy
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SCIENCE : PHYSICS
Chemists at ITbM, Nagoya University have developed a super-photostable fluorescent dye called PhoxBright 430 (PB430) to visualize cellular ultra-structure by super-resolution microscopy. The exceptional photostability of this new dye enables continuous STED imaging. With its ability to tag proteins with fluorescent labels, PB430 demonstrates its use in the 3-D construction and multicolor imaging of biological structures.
William Kamkwamba learnt physics through pictures, built windmills in drought-hit Malawi
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SCIENCE : PHYSICS
There was a point when William Kamkwamba had to drop out of school as his family could barely consume a few spoonfuls of food every day, let one school fees
Eclipse glasses distributed by U of L physics students may not be safe
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SCIENCE : PHYSICS
LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WDRB) -- Eclipse glasses distributed by the University of Louisville's Society of Physics Students may not be safe to use after all.
New bioimaging technique is fast and economical
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SCIENCE : PHYSICS
A new approach to optical imaging makes it possible to quickly and economically monitor multiple molecular interactions in a large area of living tissue?such as an organ or a small animal; technology that could have applications in medical diagnosis, guided surgery, or pre-clinical drug testing. The method, which is detailed in Nature Photonics, is capable of simultaneously tracking 16 colors of spatially linked information over an area spanning several centimeters, and can capture interactions
Solutal Marangoni flows of miscible liquid drive transport without surface contamination
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SCIENCE : PHYSICS
A research team led by Hyoungsoo Kim, a professor of Mechanical Engineering at KAIST, succeeded in quantifying the phenomenon called, the Marangoni effect, which occurs at the interface between alcohol and water. It is expected that this finding will be a valuable resource used for effectively removing impurities from a surface fluid without any contamination, and developing materials that can replace surfactants.
Engineers deliver new key components to help power a fusion energy experiment
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SCIENCE : PHYSICS
Fusion power, which lights the sun and stars, requires temperatures of millions of degrees to fuse the particles inside plasma, a soup of charged gas that fuels fusion reactions. Here on Earth, scientists developing fusion as a safe, clean and abundant source of energy must produce temperatures hotter than the core of the sun in doughnut-shaped facilities called tokamaks. Much of the power needed to reach these temperatures comes from high-energy beams that physicists pump into the plasma throug
Economic growth -- vastly slower than we thought (maybe)
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SCIENCE : PHYSICS
You'd think that by now we'd have a pretty good empirical understanding of how economies grow, i.e. what the normal pattern of growth ...
Researchers found that rotation causes the zig-zag of rising particles
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SCIENCE : PHYSICS
Every curious person must have observed air bubbles rising through an aquarium tank of water.
Astronomy and physics professor talks solar eclipse totality
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SCIENCE : PHYSICS
Traffic will be something to stay up to speed on because thousands are expected to travel downstate to witness the solar eclipse in totality.In Springfield, we'll experience a partial eclipse. The sun will be about 96 percent covered, but for many, they wa
Penumbral Lunar Eclipse of February 10, 2017
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SCIENCE : PHYSICS
Penumbral Eclipse Friday evening the Moon will have a close encounter with the Earth's shadow 240,000 miles out in space. As the Moon re...
Raindrops and Mushrooms: Physics on a Small Scale
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SCIENCE : PHYSICS
Though we can?t see it, mushrooms are firing minuscule cannons right under our noses, writes Helen Czerski. What?s going on in that tiny world?
A quick and easy way to shut down instabilities in fusion devices
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SCIENCE : PHYSICS
Scientists have discovered a remarkably simple way to suppress a common instability that can halt fusion reactions and damage the walls of reactors built to create a "star in a jar." The findings, published in June in the journal Physical Review Letters, stem from experiments performed on the National Spherical Torus Experiment-Upgrade (NSTX-U), at the Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL).
Red (power: pin 2) wire for servo motor not connected
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SCIENCE : PHYSICS
Why is the red (power: pin 2) wire for the servo motor not connected to anything in this circuit?...
$1.2M NSF grant helps integrate computational science into high school physics
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SCIENCE : PHYSICS
WSYM-TV$1.2M NSF grant helps integrate computational science into high school physicsWSYM-TV“High school physics courses are beginning to emphasize modeling, which helps students develop intertwined conceptual and mathematical descriptions of physical phenomena,” Caballero said. “The practice is similar to the way physicists study various
USD Physics Department to Host Solar Eclipse Event Aug. 21
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SCIENCE : PHYSICS
VERMILLION, S.D. ? The University of South Dakota Department of Physics will host a solar eclipse viewing party on Monday, Aug. 21, from 12:40 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. The event, which will include telescope viewing and interaction with physics faculty and graduate students on the lawn on the east side of the Akeley-Lawrence Science Center, is free and open to the public.
Team images tiny quasicrystals as they form
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SCIENCE : PHYSICS
When Israeli scientist Daniel Shechtman first saw a quasicrystal through his microscope in 1982, he reportedly thought to himself, "Eyn chaya kazo"?Hebrew for, "There can be no such creature."
The Physics of the Western Wall
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SCIENCE : PHYSICS
This blog post is dedicated to my physics teacher, Malka, who many years ago taught me that everything that......