The physics of Tagore: Promoting the scientist in the poet
The physics of Tagore: Promoting the scientist in the poet

Eminent scientists, along with thespian Soumitra Chatterjee, take on a challenging task

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10 Science Podcasts You Should Listen to Right Now
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SCIENCE : PHYSICS
It seems like there's a podcast for everything these days, and everyone (and their dog) is making a podcast. Whether you?re into beekeeping ...
The New Playground of an Unexpected Bose-Einstein Condensate
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SCIENCE : PHYSICS
Most playgrounds feature slides, swings, and other structures that encourage visitors to explore cause-and-effect, test their physical limit...
Commemorating 30 years of optical vortices: A comprehensive review
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SCIENCE : PHYSICS
Commemorating the 30th anniversary of the prediction of optical vortices, researchers in China?Xing Fu at Tsinghua University, Xiaocong Yuan at Shenzhen University and co-authors?reviewed the 30-year development of the understanding and applications of these intriguing phenomena.
'Hot' electrons in metallic nanostructures?non-thermal carriers or heating?
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SCIENCE : PHYSICS
What happens to a piece of metal when you shine light on it? This question, which has been one of the driving forces of modern physics, gained renewed interest in recent years, with the advances in fabrication of small metallic nano-particles. When a piece of metal is very small, it turns out that it can couple extremely well to visible light. The study of fundamental and applicable aspects of this interaction is typically referred to as plasmonics.
Light-based 'tractor beam' assembles materials at the nanoscale
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SCIENCE : PHYSICS
Modern construction is a precision endeavor. Builders must use components manufactured to meet specific standards?such as beams of a desired composition or rivets of a specific size. The building industry relies on manufacturers to create these components reliably and reproducibly in order to construct secure bridges and sound skyscrapers.
Why is ice so slippery?
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SCIENCE : PHYSICS
The answer lies in a film of water that is generated by friction, one that is far thinner than expected and much more viscous than usual water through its resemblance to the "snow cones" of crushed ice we drink during the summer. This phenomenon was recently demonstrated by researchers from the CNRS and ENS-PSL, with support from the